There's growing evidence that children can spread the coronavirus

The more we learn about kids and the coronavirus, the riskier reopening schools for in-person learning appears to be, at least in areas with high caseloads. There have already been many reports about the virus spreading through schools and summer camps, and evidence has begun to support the notion that children can play a key role in community transmission.

German study finds low Covid-19 infection rate in schools

Very few of 2,000 schoolchildren and teachers tested in the German state of Saxony showed antibodies to Covid-19, a study has found, suggesting schools may not play as big a role in spreading the virus as some had feared. The largest study conducted in Germany on schoolchildren and teachers included testing in schools where there were coronavirus outbreaks.

Older Children Spread the Coronavirus Just as Much as Adults, New Study Finds

In the heated debate over reopening schools, one burning question has been whether and how efficiently children can spread the virus to others. A study of 65000 from South Korea offers an answer: Children younger than 10 transmit to others much less often than adults do, but the risk is not zero. And those between the ages of 10 and 19 can spread the virus at least as well as adults do.

What happens when flu meets Covid-19?

The real unknown is what Covid-19 does around other viruses. Every autumn there is a predictable series of outbreaks of respiratory viruses. It starts with rhinovirus, the main cause of the common cold, which breaks out every September as young children go to school and swap mucus. As no parent needs to be told, children are to sniffles what mosquitoes are to malaria.